Fast Moon

inu-fiction:

When vorpalgirl and I created inu-fiction, we wanted to draw attention to the most satisfying Inuyasha fanfiction. Until now, we’ve only linked to Memoirs by fast-moon, because well-written fanfiction is rare and time is short. 

Thanks to a link left by shikonnollama, I’ve found another fanfiction worth my time: “Morphology” by Almandine-Azaleea.

In less than 5,000 words, Almandine-Azaleea captured the best parts of Inuyasha and Kagome’s relationship. They looked past the circulating fanon and realized that while Inuyasha may not be smooth, he’s not stupid either. The plot is simply Inuyasha doing a homework assignment for Kagome, but Almandine-Azaleea packs characterzation and warm, fluffy feelings into that simplicity.

"Morphology" is not perfect, as it does get the name of Inuyasha’s garments wrong. However, this has no affect on the plot or characters.

The summary’s short and sweet: “Some words bear a special meaning for Inuyasha.” Authors like Almadine-Azaleea and fanfics like “Morphology” gives words special meaning for fans.

I… ehhh…. I was kind of turned off by the first word, and it didn’t really get any better.  I’m not really sure how this story goes past fanon, because it’s still got a couple of aggravating pieces of it.

First off, is the first word in the story: “Wench”.

Inuyasha has NEVER called Kagome this, or anything close to it.  He called her “bitch” once towards the very beginning of the story, and referred to her as “woman” for maybe the first volume, but after that she was on a first-name basis.  Inuyasha’s derogatory behavior towards Kagome stopped very early in the series, but most fans continue to make him act this way in stories meant to take place much later, assuming his character has not developed or learned anything at all.

Yes, he still calls Kagome “temee" sometimes, which is often translated as "bitch".  However
1) This word simply means “you”, but is a form of “you” where a superior is addressing a lesser.  Since English has no means of denoting this, an epithet is typically substituted.
2) He ONLY calls her this when he’s really pissed off at her, almost exclusively after a “sit”.  He does not call her this on a regular basis.  Typically his “you” word towards her is “omee”, which is still somewhat rude, but not derogatory.

There’s also the fangirl Japanese present.  While I don’t have a problem with Japanese being used in a fanfic per se, I’d prefer there be a reason to keep a word in Japanese beyond just “Ooh, look, Japanese.”  This being:
1) The word has no suitable English equivalent.  If someone wanted to keep the “temee" I mentioned above in Japanese due to "bitch" being more of a substitution than an accurate translation, I can handle that.  But I see no reason to have Inuyasha say "shikata nee" in an English fanfic when he could have just as easily said "Oh well" and nothing would have been lost.
2) The specific Japanese word being used is significant.  This is typically only if what they were saying in Japanese had some sort of grammatical significance or relationship to another word that doesn’t come across well in English, like two Japanese words with similar pronunciations but different meanings (like the “puropoozu”/”kuro bouzu" thing in the drama.  Both these words have simple English translations ("proposal" and "black monk", respectively), but the context behind their usage necessitates keeping them in Japanese in that particular situation).  Therefore, pointing out that "ai" means "love" and so on in this story didn’t seem to serve any necessary purpose other than, "Look, I know Japanese words".

Page 25

inu-fiction:

shousetsu-inuyasha:

"Goshinboku!"  She spotted Goshinboku, whose branches always calmly swayed in the breeze through the shrine, through a thicket of bushes.  Seeing one thing familiar to her was reassuring.

(At any rate, I should probably head over there!)  Kagome raced towards it.

When she reached nearer to Goshinboku, a strong gust of wind heralded her arrival, causing her to unconsciously close her eyes.  The trees in the forest groaned.

When Kagome opened her eyes, she saw that at Goshinboku’s wide trunk there was a beautiful bonfire burning with plumes of silver smoke.

Wait, no.  That wasn’t flames and smoke.

(A boy…?)

It was a boy.  He looked tall and slender, and about the same age as Kagome.  He was standing leaned against the trunk of Goshinboku, bathed in the sun streaming diagonally through the branches.  What she’d seen as fire was a scarlet garment and pants, what she’d seen as smoke was beautiful silver hair that extended down his back.

What was strange was that his body was wrapped in many of Goshinboku’s thick roots.

That’s one of the most complimentary descriptions of Inuyasha I’ve ever read.

Oh, just wait until the next page where she makes an observation so complimentary that it’s practically blasphemous. :D

Tetsusaiga vs Tessaiga

fell-down-the-well:

fast-moon:

fell-down-the-well:

The full word yes, it is made up. But I’m well aware that I have to put three separate words together to form it. Ergo I type Te-TSU and get the proper beginning to the full name. 鉄. Added in with the Sai and you get the complete full beginning.

Typing out Tessai in any way or shape doesn’t give you the correct beginning to the name. Whether you start with Te-tsu or just Tessai. So spelled out its still TeTSUSaiGa.

Though how its pronounced is-indeed  Tessaiga…Though pronunciation is a whole other ball of wax~! lol,. Not getting into that one.

Sesshoumaru is indeed I little tsu. Because you need the little one to spell his name out correctly. Little tsu’s give you the double consonants. Big tsus are just TSU. And I realize his name is not a real word either-so you have to break it down to two separate ones.

Yes, you have to put three separate words together to make “Tessaiga”.  And the first word, by itself, is “tetsu”.  But if it’s followed by another word that starts with a hard consonant, the “tsu” is softened.

Look at that word you gave in your previous post: 鉄鎖.  This word is “tessa”.  And yet there’s that “tetsu" at the beginning, but not making the sound "tetsu" because it’s used in conjunction with a second character that starts with a hard consonant.  It’s very similar to English sticking an "n" at the end of the word "a" if it’s followed by a word that starts with a vowel.  You can type "a", and you can type "apple", but you don’t say "a apple", you say "an apple".  Similarly here, you can say "tetsu”, and you can say “sai”, but if you put them together it’s “tessai”.

Saying “Sesshoumaru’s name has the little ‘tsu' because you need one to spell his name correctly” is putting the cart before the horse.  Sesshoumaru's name has the little 'tsu' because when you combine the characters 'setsu' and 'shou’, grammatically they become ‘sesshou' by default.

I think we’ll just have to agree to disagree~ Heh. I’m not out to change how people want to spell it anyway. I did say it didn’t matter at the forefront. I was just simply pointing it out. :P

Besides-imo Tetsusaiga looks cooler then Tessaiga. Just as I think Kikyou is more elegant and pretty looking than Kikyō.

I’ve been mulling over whether to respond to this since your mind seems to be made up.  This discussion has never been about preferred spellings, since if it’s your personal preference to spell it “Tetsusaiga”, that’s fine, since that’s how the English version spells it.  But I have a hard time letting incorrect assertions about how Japanese spelling and grammar work stand, so for other people’s sakes let’s try to clear this up from the beginning.

Japanese kanji have multiple pronunciations depending on how they’re used in a word.  For the past 1000 years or so, they’ve been handwritten so nobody had to care how specifically a character is pronounced before they wrote it.  However, with the advent of keyboards, this posed a problem due to the fact that there are tens of thousands of kanji and only about 45 keys on a keyboard.

The solution was the IME, where you could type one of the valid pronunciations of a character and be given a list of kanji that used that pronunciation.  Note that the pronunciation you type is not necessarily the pronunciation used in the word you’re trying to write.

Case in point:  Try typing “kurogane”, “kuda”, and “kiba”.  You get this:

鉄砕牙

Or how about “ken”, “yoru”, and “sa”?  You get this:

犬夜叉

And yet the series isn’t about Kenyorusa and his sword Kuroganekudakiba.  This is because, in those combinations, those kanji use different pronunciations than the ones you typed in order to generate them.

The reason “Tessai” does not give you the correct result when you type it is because it is a made-up combination that is not in a standard computer’s dictionary.  This does not mean the spelling is wrong.  It’s like typing “Sango” into MS Word and getting a red underline and a suggestion to change it to “Mango”, and concluding the Sango’s name must therefore actually be Mango (when we all know that’s actually Bankotsu).

But when a word is not in the dictionary, you have to build it from scratch by typing out its component kanji individually using any one of their standard readings.  However, you are typing out their individual readings, not how they are read in combination.  The only thing typing into an IME does is give you a list of kanji to choose from, and has absolutely zero bearing on how that kanji is going to be pronounced in the final word you end up creating.  Japanese is phonetic, so “spelling” and “pronunciation” are the same thing, however a single character can have multiple spellings/pronunciations depending on how it’s used.

Even Google Translate knows this and will adjust the reading accordingly no matter what you type in to generate the characters:

Tetsusaiga vs Tessaiga

fell-down-the-well:

fast-moon:

fell-down-the-well:

fast-moon:

fell-down-the-well:

Meh-This isn’t a big deal or anything-but I just wanted to point out that spelling the name of Inuyasha’s fang blade phonetically correctly in romaji- it is indeed Tetsusaiga.

The “tsu” sound in the name is the big (capital) version of “tsu” つ, as apposed to the little (lowercase) version of “tsu” っ. So when put with the rest of the word the sound still comes out to “tsu” rather than the double consonant that you would get with the lowercase “tsu”, like in Sesshoumaru.

You can’t actually spell the word in kanji correctly without the capital “tsu”, ergo it is indeed spelled Tetsusaiga.  

鉄際牙
てつさいが

Actually, it is a small “tsu”.

The problem is that the font used in the furigana in the manga makes all the characters the same size.  Using your Sesshoumaru example:

image

With the sizing of the furigana, his name looks like it’s “Setsushiyoumaru”.  However, we know this isn’t right, but only because “sesshou” is a real word.  “Tessaiga” is a made-up word, therefore it’s not as clear whether the “tsu” is small or not using this font.  When it’s written in other fonts, however, the small “tsu” is more apparent.  This is how it’s given on the Japanese wiki:

image

I have a Japanese keyboard…I cannot make the word with a small “tsu.” Only a big one.

鉄鎖  Is what I get with a small “tsu”. That’s all I get with a small “tsu”.  And its not the right kanji for the beginning of the blade’s name.

So it is a big one. I’m sorry to bust that theory up…But I wanted to try spelling it with a Japanese keyboard…and the capital “tsu” is the only one that gave the correct kanji for the beginning of the name.  

So it still is Tetsusaiga…x~x

The reason it’s not coming up on your keyboard is that it’s a made-up word and therefore not in your computer’s dictionary.  When I want to type out “Tessaiga” with my IME, I have to type “tetsu" (鉄), "kudaku" (砕く), and "kiba" (牙) to get the correct letters.  The same goes for other made-up words like "Kouga".  Try typing Kouga’s name with your keyboard and you will never get the right kanji, either, because that particular combination is made up and therefore not in the dictionary.  You have to write "hagane" (鋼) and "kiba" (牙) separately.

I mean, if you only want to write the first character of Sesshoumaru’s name, you can’t write “sess” because that’s not going to give you anything.  You have to write “setsu" (殺).  And yet despite this, his name is not "Setsushoumaru", it’s "Sesshoumaru".  "Tessaiga" works the same way.

The full word yes, it is made up. But I’m well aware that I have to put three separate words together to form it. Ergo I type Te-TSU and get the proper beginning to the full name. 鉄. Added in with the Sai and you get the complete full beginning.

Typing out Tessai in any way or shape doesn’t give you the correct beginning to the name. Whether you start with Te-tsu or just Tessai. So spelled out its still TeTSUSaiGa.

Though how its pronounced is-indeed  Tessaiga…Though pronunciation is a whole other ball of wax~! lol,. Not getting into that one.

Sesshoumaru is indeed I little tsu. Because you need the little one to spell his name out correctly. Little tsu’s give you the double consonants. Big tsus are just TSU. And I realize his name is not a real word either-so you have to break it down to two separate ones.

Yes, you have to put three separate words together to make “Tessaiga”.  And the first word, by itself, is “tetsu”.  But if it’s followed by another word that starts with a hard consonant, the “tsu” is softened.

Look at that word you gave in your previous post: 鉄鎖.  This word is “tessa”.  And yet there’s that “tetsu" at the beginning, but not making the sound "tetsu" because it’s used in conjunction with a second character that starts with a hard consonant.  It’s very similar to English sticking an "n" at the end of the word "a" if it’s followed by a word that starts with a vowel.  You can type "a", and you can type "apple", but you don’t say "a apple", you say "an apple".  Similarly here, you can say "tetsu”, and you can say “sai”, but if you put them together it’s “tessai”.

Saying “Sesshoumaru’s name has the little ‘tsu' because you need one to spell his name correctly” is putting the cart before the horse.  Sesshoumaru's name has the little 'tsu' because when you combine the characters 'setsu' and 'shou’, grammatically they become ‘sesshou' by default.

Tetsusaiga vs Tessaiga

fell-down-the-well:

fast-moon:

fell-down-the-well:

Meh-This isn’t a big deal or anything-but I just wanted to point out that spelling the name of Inuyasha’s fang blade phonetically correctly in romaji- it is indeed Tetsusaiga.

The “tsu” sound in the name is the big (capital) version of “tsu” つ, as apposed to the little (lowercase) version of “tsu” っ. So when put with the rest of the word the sound still comes out to “tsu” rather than the double consonant that you would get with the lowercase “tsu”, like in Sesshoumaru.

You can’t actually spell the word in kanji correctly without the capital “tsu”, ergo it is indeed spelled Tetsusaiga.  

鉄際牙
てつさいが

Actually, it is a small “tsu”.

The problem is that the font used in the furigana in the manga makes all the characters the same size.  Using your Sesshoumaru example:

image

With the sizing of the furigana, his name looks like it’s “Setsushiyoumaru”.  However, we know this isn’t right, but only because “sesshou” is a real word.  “Tessaiga” is a made-up word, therefore it’s not as clear whether the “tsu” is small or not using this font.  When it’s written in other fonts, however, the small “tsu” is more apparent.  This is how it’s given on the Japanese wiki:

image

I have a Japanese keyboard…I cannot make the word with a small “tsu.” Only a big one.

鉄鎖  Is what I get with a small “tsu”. That’s all I get with a small “tsu”.  And its not the right kanji for the beginning of the blade’s name.

So it is a big one. I’m sorry to bust that theory up…But I wanted to try spelling it with a Japanese keyboard…and the capital “tsu” is the only one that gave the correct kanji for the beginning of the name.  

So it still is Tetsusaiga…x~x

The reason it’s not coming up on your keyboard is that it’s a made-up word and therefore not in your computer’s dictionary.  When I want to type out “Tessaiga” with my IME, I have to type “tetsu" (鉄), "kudaku" (砕く), and "kiba" (牙) to get the correct letters.  The same goes for other made-up words like "Kouga".  Try typing Kouga’s name with your keyboard and you will never get the right kanji, either, because that particular combination is made up and therefore not in the dictionary.  You have to write "hagane" (鋼) and "kiba" (牙) separately.

I mean, if you only want to write the first character of Sesshoumaru’s name, you can’t write “sess” because that’s not going to give you anything.  You have to write “setsu" (殺).  And yet despite this, his name is not "Setsushoumaru", it’s "Sesshoumaru".  "Tessaiga" works the same way.

Tetsusaiga vs Tessaiga

fell-down-the-well:

Meh-This isn’t a big deal or anything-but I just wanted to point out that spelling the name of Inuyasha’s fang blade phonetically correctly in romaji- it is indeed Tetsusaiga.

The “tsu” sound in the name is the big (capital) version of “tsu” つ, as apposed to the little (lowercase) version of “tsu” っ. So when put with the rest of the word the sound still comes out to “tsu” rather than the double consonant that you would get with the lowercase “tsu”, like in Sesshoumaru.

You can’t actually spell the word in kanji correctly without the capital “tsu”, ergo it is indeed spelled Tetsusaiga.  

鉄際牙
てつさいが

Actually, it is a small “tsu”.

The problem is that the font used in the furigana in the manga makes all the characters the same size.  Using your Sesshoumaru example:

With the sizing of the furigana, his name looks like it’s “Setsushiyoumaru”.  However, we know this isn’t right, but only because “sesshou” is a real word.  “Tessaiga” is a made-up word, therefore it’s not as clear whether the “tsu” is small or not using this font.  When it’s written in other fonts, however, the small “tsu” is more apparent.  This is how it’s given on the Japanese wiki:

inukagkids:

Oh no, guys, I attempted to animate an audio drama!

I started this project several weeks ago, but kinda burned myself out after spending three days inking 170 of the 377 frames. I don’t really plan to ever go back and finish it, so I decided just to upload what I had.

Thank you to inu-drama for providing the translation and thus making this attempted project possible!

Haha, sweet.

Fun fact: in Japanese, a guy laying his head on a woman’s lap and having her clean out his ears is kind of short-hand for “old married couple”.  Sort of the equivalent of us envisioning a man and a woman sitting together on a porch in rocking chairs.

inu-fiction:

szszsz:

Some fanfics are so good they deserve fanfiction

Memoirs by fast-moon comes to mind. I’d love a fixfic where Kougyoku managed to play dead and escape her imprisonment. Such a wonderful kitsune, and she suffered such an awful fate.

My beta reader actually HAS written fanfiction of it, but it’s all AU slash fic between Akagane and Inu-papa where timey-wimey stuff has happened wherein they’re both adults in the modern era and the whole “adoptive father” thing never happened.  X3

21 plays

Because if Inu-papa had a character song, this would have been it, anyway.  Sung by his Japanese voice actor for his character in “Nadia: Secret of Blue Water”, but the lyrics are still stunningly appropriate.  Heck, even the title of the song (“You Must Live”) is his final words to Izayoi in the third movie.

For some silly reason
I overthrew a country
That’s who I live as now
Discarded my kindness and lived

Burdened with the weight of my sins
Should I someday be redeemed for my past
I swear on my life
I can only walk a blood-stained path

No matter how much blood I spill
It’s something I have to do
I can’t die yet
Not yet
Not until my personal convictions
Have been fulfilled
So now
I will survive, even if alone
I will survive, even if alone

That discarded kindness
And those forgotten tears
For some reason are now returning
To find love once again

There is no time for tears
That’s what I told myself
But your eyes
Caused my heart to open
That you could love a person such as me
I want you to live

So that these mistakes never happens again
Should I someday fall
By your hand
My life has softened
That you could love a person such as me
I want you to live
Yes
Please live, even if it’s hard
Please live, even if it’s hard

inu-fiction:

The latest chapter of fast-moon's epic origin story for the Inu no Taishō is up!

Before the Inu no Taishō was a legend, he was a young pup looking for his missing mother…

Preparations for the battle against the vile Souzou Tennou must continue, yet even in the face of great evil, life finds a way. Akagane prepares himself for the worst, while the young Inu no Taishō reminds him they have much to celebrate. Will sorrow taint Hisui and Akagane’s new joy?

Aw, thanks for the link, guys.

I actually wrote a lot of this chapter while recovering from a couple weeks of constant panic attacks that had left my stress levels so high that I couldn’t sleep and was getting nervous about every slightest thing.  So my beta reader suggested I just write out a scene of the characters discussing anxiety and how self-defeating it was in order to help cope.  I don’t really know how much it contributed to my recovery, but I’m doing a lot better now.

(And a word of advice:  If you find yourself feeling ill in a way you’ve never felt before, do NOT Google your symptoms in an effort to figure out what you have.  You’ll only end up freaking yourself out)